Restored trails allow access to Yosemite’s many wonders.

Trail Rehabilitation & Access

Funding Needed for Trail Rehabilitation & Access: $1,624,376

For many, a visit to Yosemite includes enjoying the vast trail network, whether it’s a gentle family stroll on the Mirror Lake Trail or a heart-pumping adventure to the top of Yosemite Falls. Trails are the best way to see the park, which is why crews regularly maintain and restore the park’s 800-mile trail network. Thanks to these efforts, you can access Yosemite’s wonders without disturbing natural resources.

Student Conservation Association youth crews restore Yosemite’s wilderness.

Student Conservation Association youth crews restore Yosemite’s wilderness

Yosemite work crews improve the John Muir Trail and meadow habitat in Lyell Canyon.

Improving Yosemite’s most popular trails and protecting delicate habitat

California Conservation Corps crew restore trails in Benson Lake and Lyell Fork.

California Conservation Corps crew restore trails and develop skills

Trail crews will restore the John Muir Trail and Mist Trailhead in Yosemite

Trail crews will restore the John Muir Trail and Mist Trailhead in Yosemite

Youth crews build new climber access trails and protect Yosemite’s fragile habitat.

Building new climber access trails, protecting fragile habitat and engaging youth

Social trails along Tenaya Lake's North Shore in need of repair by Yosemite crews.

Restoring trails and improving visitor access to Tenaya Lake's North Shore