Replanting native milkweeds and other native plants supports important pollinators and restores natural habitat in Yosemite Valley.

Habitat Restoration

From wetlands to forests to high-elevation “sky islands,” Yosemite’s habitats support an amazing number of plant and animal species. Natural and human forces can damage these ecosystems, however. Invasive grasses sap resources from native wildflowers and pollinators; hikers inadvertently trample fragile meadows. Your support helps restore Yosemite’s habitats so diverse flora and fauna can continue to thrive and visitors can enjoy the park’s wilderness for years to come.

Yosemite work crews improve the John Muir Trail and meadow habitat in Lyell Canyon.

Improving Yosemite’s most popular trails and protecting delicate habitat

A Student Conservation Association youth crew works together to clear debris from trails and restore wilderness character to Yosemite’s backcountry.

SCA youth crews restore Yosemite’s wilderness

Replanting native milkweeds and other native plants supports important pollinators and restores natural habitat in Yosemite Valley.

Restore Yosemite’s native plants and protect pollinators

Adding Ackerson Meadow to Yosemite National Park will protect prime meadowlands and provide refuge for endangered species.

Ensure the preservation of wildlife and habitat in Ackerson Meadow

Rangers and volunteers remove invasive velvet grass from Yosemite’s high country meadows to protect native wildflowers.

Save Yosemite’s high country wildflowers

The restoration of the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias balances visitor needs with ecological protection.

Preserving Yosemite's ancient trees for future generations